Posts Tagged ‘ Pioneer ’

The Final Laps

Posted on: June 7, 2011 | Comments(2) | Race Tracks | By: Iowa Speedway

Thanks for stopping back to the Iowa Speedway blog here on Indycar.com! Like the drivers who will be thanking their sponsors before and after racing in the Iowa Corn Indy 250 presented by Pioneer on June 25th, we too need to thank some people first before we get into this months topic – our readers. Without you we wouldn’t even be writing this story so thank you!

Watching this year’s Indy 500, which by the way was amazing, and seeing the final pass for the win an idea popped into my head – this month’s topic.

JR took the lead with three laps to go; I thought for sure the race would be over in the neighborhood of 120 seconds since drivers completed laps at just over 40 seconds when running at full speed. Could I have been more wrong?! Maybe. When JR took reins of this year’s 500 and until the winner, Dan Weldon, crossed the finish line there was an elapse time of 128 seconds. Eight seconds is a big deal in the world of motorsports!

A combination of Weldon being behind JR and not running at full speed to conserve fuel makes up that eight second difference. In my opinion, that final eight seconds is and probably will always be the longest of JR’s racing career, sadly.

Shall we compare the last 128 seconds of the Indy 500 to what might be the last 128 seconds here at Iowa Speedway so you can see how vastly different things can be from track to track? Lets!

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Tony Kanaan leading at the Iowa Speedway in 2010

In the time they turned those three laps at Indianapolis they would’ve completed over seven laps at Iowa Speedway. Circuits around this 7/8 or .875 mile oval are 17.5 seconds long at full speed in an IZOD IndyCar. That is a total of 28 turns here compared to only 12 they completed at Indianapolis, plus the lap traffic.

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Kanaan and Castroneves after the 2010 Iowa Corn Indy 250

Look back to 2010 when TK took the lead with 10 laps to go, about 175 seconds left in the race, and you can really see there was a greater chance of something going wrong. He had 40 turns to get through while dealing with several lap down cars. The winner is never known until the car crosses the finish line, and never has that been more true following this year’s 100th Anniversary of the Indianapolis 500.

Be sure to come out to Iowa Speedway on June 25th to see if we have that same excitement during the final seconds/laps of this year’s Iowa Corn Indy 250 presented by Pioneer. Thanks for reading. Please keep your comments and suggestions coming. We’re listening – and thanks again for the support!

Iowa Improvements

Posted on: May 11, 2011 | Comments(2) | Race Tracks | By: Iowa Speedway

For this month’s blog from Iowa Speedway we are switching it up a little.

We normally would talk about all the great racing you will see for the 2011 Iowa Corn 250 presented by Pioneer, which is under the lights this year, but instead we thought visuals would be short, sweet and to the point.

Lets start with parking as that is typically the first impression of the speed factory here in Newton, Iowa. The biggest improvement in the parking lots this year is the addition of more than a dozen 20 foot tall polls in and around the parking lots with numbers and letters to help identify where your at. Many of our fans have said it has been hard to find their car post race and we listened.

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Next is the fan walk which runs behind pit road and by victory lane. Casey’s General Store has come on to sponsor the fan walk and the things which are going to take place there are just too many to list. So that means you’ll have to come out to take in all the experiences!

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Do you have a motorhome or tailgating bus? Why not get your party moved inside the fence with one of our new RV spots. We have over 100 of these spots on the back stretch and located off turn four 20 more RV spots have been added for this 2011 season.

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Lets finish off this article with the Pizza Ranch Victory Lane and a picture of the construction going on there as this is where a driver wants to end up at the end of the race. In the past the winner has drove down the fan walk three foot away from fans on either side. Yes this was cool, but a huge safety hazard.  Starting this year the driver will now come in behind victory lane. Make sure to come down to the Casey’s Fan Walk following the Iowa Corn Indy 250 to enjoy victory lane. Maybe you will even get a slice of Pizza Ranch Pizza from the winner as winners have done that in the past!

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Thanks for reading (viewing our pictures). Please keep your comments and suggestions coming. We’re listening – and thanks again for the support!

The Versatile Veggie

Posted on: June 18, 2010 | Comments(2) | Race Tracks | By: Dave

 As Americans’ favorite vegetable, corn ranks second to the potato (mashed is the top choice) in a recent survey.

Iowans will concede that honor to their neighbors from Idaho, but they claim boasting rights regarding corn as the grain of choice for biofuel. Corn grown in Iowa is driving the alternative fuel industry that produced a record 10.75 billion gallons of biofuel last year, reducing demand for imported oil by 364 million barrels. So far, no viable fuel has been developed utilizing the potato.

Corn is the most abundant U.S. crop, valued at $47.6 billion in 2009, and the U.S. is the largest producer and exporter in the world. U.S. farmers will produce a record 13.37 billion bushels in the autumn harvest.  The amount of corn used for ethanol production in 2010 will total a record 4.55 billion bushels, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

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The Official Logo

Of course, this all ties in to the IZOD IndyCar Series, which is the only form of motorsports to use a renewable and environmentally-friendly fuel (100 percent fuel-grade ethanol) to power its Honda Indy V-8 engines. Corn ethanol (the fermentation of plant sugars) is the fuel source for the fourth Iowa Corn Indy 250 presented by Pioneer.

And here’s one parting stat to share on Father’s Day: Farmers grow five times as much corn as they did in the 1930s on 20 percent less land and produce 70 percent more corn per pound of fertilizer than they did 35 years ago.